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17/02/16

  03:49:00 pm by Admin, Categories: Security

A protected home network means your family can use the Internet safely and securely.

Most households now run networks of devices linked to the Internet, including computers, laptops, gaming devices, TVs, tablets, and smartphones that access wireless networks. To protect your home network and your family, you need to have the right tools in place and confidence that family members can use the Internet safely and securely.

The first step is to Keep a Clean Machine and make sure all of your Internet-enabled devices have the latest operating system, web browsers and security software. This includes mobile devices that access your wireless network.

Secure Your Wireless Router

A wireless network means connecting an Internet access point – such as a cable or DSL modem – to a wireless router. Going wireless is a convenient way to allow multiple devices to connect to the Internet from different areas of your home. However, unless you secure your router, you’re vulnerable to people accessing information on your computer, using your Internet service for free and potentially using your network to commit cybercrimes.

Here are ways to secure your wireless router:

  • Change the name of your router: The default ID - called a service set identifier” (SSID) or “extended service set identifier” (ESSID ) – is assigned by the manufacturer. Change your router to a name that is unique to you and won’t be easily guessed by others.
  • Change the pre-set password on your router: When creating a new password, make sure it is long and strong, using a mix of numbers, letters and symbols.
  • Review security options: When choosing your router’s level of security, opt for WPA2, if available, or WPA. They are more secure than the WEP option.
  • Create a guest password: Some routers allow for guests to use the network via a separate password.  If you have many visitors to your home, it’s a good idea to set up a guest network.
  • Use a firewall: Firewalls help keep hackers from using your computer to send out your personal information without your permission. While anti-virus software scans incoming email and files, a firewall is like a guard, watching for attempts to access your system and blocking communications with sources you don't permit. Your operating system and/or security software likely comes with a pre-installed firewall, but make sure you turn on these features.


Protect Yourself with these STOP. THINK. CONNECT. Tips:

  • Keep a clean machine: Having the latest security software, web browser, and operating system are the best defenses against viruses, malware, and other online threats.
  • Automate software updates: Many software programs will automatically connect and update to defend against known risks. Turn on automatic updates if that’s an available option.
  • Protect all devices that connect to the Internet: Along with computers, smart phones, gaming systems, and other web-enabled devices also need protection from viruses and malware.
  • Plug & scan: “USBs” and other external devices can be infected by viruses and malware. Use your security software to scan them.
  • Protect your ££: When banking and shopping, check to be sure the sites is security enabled. Look for web addresses with “https://” or “shttp://”, which means the site takes extra measures to help secure your information. “Http://” is not secure.
  • Back it up: Protect your valuable work, music, photos, and other digital information by making an electronic copy and storing it safely.

- See more at: https://staysafeonline.org/stay-safe-online/keep-a-clean-machine/securing-your-home-network#sthash.RKYdrfKz.dpuf

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15/02/16

  02:13:00 pm by Admin, Categories: Security, Virus - Ransomware - Spyware

BY MALWAREBYTES LABS

Fending off malware is more than a full-time job. Those who work in cybersecurity have their hands full patching vulnerabilities, cleaning infected machines, gathering threat intelligence, or training users on best practices. So having to worry about PUPs on top of it all can probably feel overwhelming—or at the very least a little annoying.

 That’s why we’ve come up with a PUPs cheat sheet that businesses can use to train IT staff and users. A little PUPs awareness, if you will. Read on to learn more about how you get PUPs, what they do to your computer, and how you can avoid them.

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14/02/16

  05:16:00 pm by Admin, Categories: News, Security, Virus - Ransomware - Spyware

By Mark Patton

Malware: Understanding the enemy

Today, malware is everywhere. Spreading across the web, infecting desktops, mobile, and tablets – it’s the modern, cyber equivalent of the plague.

So how did we arrive at this place? A place where it’s estimated that, in 2015 alone, close to half a billion types of malware have been identified – that’s 1.4 million types each day and seven million a week – staggering numbers when put into perspective.

Much of this malware is designed and distributed through a complex ecosystem of organised crime, out to attack innocent victims and profit from ordinary people’s lack of knowledge of how to protect themselves online.

Well, to understand the present, you have to understand the past.

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17/08/15

  11:44:00 am by Admin, Categories: News, Security

Proofpoint has presented its assessment of the security threat landscape for the first half of 2015, and it makes for grim reading for IT managers.
The good news is that the volume of unsolicited email has declined to levels not seen since since 2012. The EU incidentally is the largest generator (15 percent) of total unsolicited emails, followed by the USA, China, Russia and even Indonesia and Argentina.
This finding backs up Symantec’s research last month, which found that spam emails have fallen to its lowest rate for 12 years.


Malicious Attachments
But the Proofpoint report also revealed that threat landscape is evolving, and IT managers should be aware of the major trends that has emerged so far this year, and educate their staff accordingly.
Whilst the decline of unsolicited email is to be welcomed, it seems the loss in volume is more than made up for in maliciousness.
Indeed, there seems to have been a shift from cyber-attacks that rely on URLs, to email campaigns that contain a malicious document attachment.
“The most striking development of the first six months of 2015 was a massive shift of threat activity from the URL-based campaigns that had dominated 2014, to campaigns that relied on malicious document attachments to deliver malware payloads,” said Proofpoint. “Malicious attachments have dominated the campaigns of 2015 to date, driven by the massive volumes of attachments and messages delivered by the Dridex campaigners as well as other botnets.”


Phishing Lures
Meanwhile another trend to have emerged concerns that of phishing attacks, whereby someone impersonates a trustworthy source with the purpose of acquiring sensitive information. In the past these attacks were focused on consumers, but it seems that business users are increasingly being targetted.
The most commonly used phishing lures in the previous year are social network communications, whereby attackers use social network invitations and connection requests (fake LinkedIn connection requests etc).
Another popular lure are financial account warnings (emails supposedly from your bank, credit card etc). Finally, order confirmation messages are also being used as a phishing lure.
And it seems that social media is also a viable way for attackers to distribute malicious content. “A single phishing lure, malware link or spam message posted to a high profile corporate social media destination may be viewed by ten thousand or more potential victims,” warned Proofpoint.


Report Recommendations
So the advice for IT managers is simple. Proofpoint recommends that organisations make use of threat solutions that utilise dynamic malware analysis and predictive analysis. It also says that firms should automate their threat response in order to reduce the time from detection to containment.
Businesses should also build-in comprehensive threat intelligence into their digital forensics and incident response (DFIR) tools and processes.
And finally firms should integrate security, content enforcement (encryption, DLP, etc) and archiving for email and social media to safeguard these vital communication channels.

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04/05/15

  09:11:00 am by Admin, Categories: Security

Computer repair

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